The sixth is the center of our Parisian universe.  Though we take up just a tiny sliver of its 0.8 square mile (about 300 square feet to be exact), we have spent a large chunk of our dining hours within its boundaries, everywhere from hole-in-the-wall joints to nicer sit-down restaurants to the well-frequented Monoprix supermarket for a meal back at home.  There remain many known and unknown gems to be sampled but we have no doubt that we will get through most of them, or fail trying.  After all, we love eating as much as we love living where we live.
 
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Baguettes_3
   
Old Kashmir
13, rue Grégoire de Tours
01.43.29.01.00
M° Odéon

 
Euro - 9 to 16
One day after French class, we were starving and wandering the streets in search of food during the purgatorial mid-afternoon hours; just too late for lunch and way too early for dinner.  Turning down the picturesque rue Grégoire de Tours, itself drifting into a quiet slumber, we came upon one restaurant that still seemed to be open.  In fact, it too was ending the lunch service but the nice waiter took pity on us.  He even let us order from the dinner menu at the lunch menu’s prices (9€) and with the lunch menu’s accompaniment, basmati rice.  That was how we came to have Indian food for the second time in Paris.

While the food was sufficient to quell our growling stomachs and was solid by any standard, it did not excite us as we had been excited in finding it.  Nez’s poulet masala – whole pieces of chicken in a spicy sauce with tomatoes and onions – was rather saucy and not at all “curry-like” like the stuff we were used to in San Francisco.  (Let’s leave aside for now the question of whether San Francisco’s Indian is anything like the Indian food from the home country itself.)  Riot’s agneau kofta Kashmir offered good ground lamb meatballs in a moderately spicy curry – that tasted like curry but ultimately proved to be too rich for the stomach – and decorated with a smattering of almonds and cashews.  The plain naan (2€) was a great medium to conveniently consume all the various sauces.  We left the restaurant happy that we were full but that was about all.
 
 
 
 
 
  Creamy, spicy curry:  The agneau kofta Kashmir marries lamb meat balls and rich curry.
 
 

 
 
 
On another occasion when French food – whatever it actually is – was getting to be much, we returned here solely on the basis of location.  We traded the plain naan for the garlic variety (3.80€) and instantly regretted doing so.  Great garlic naans exist but they will not be found here.  We also branched out, barely, to get the crevettes curry (10€) in addition to the old standard, poulet masala (10.50€ at dinner).  The former consisted of rather pedestrian shrimp in comparison to the standard bearer of its kind that we had in Nice, the latter was exactly as it was the previous time we had it for lunch.  All in all, it was a typical dinner and sometimes that’s all one strives for.  Sometimes it isn’t.
 
 
 
 
 
 
  A different take on a commonly ordered dish:  The poulet masala that did not look like any we had had before.
 
 
 
 
 
  Plain ol’ reliable:  The plain naan (2€).
 
 
 
 
 
  Curry with the fruit of the sea:  The crevettes curry (10€) comes with uninspiring shrimp.
 
 
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